Thursday, October 13, 2005

Both Shakespeare's Sister and The Heretik are talking about their brushes with fame. Got me thinking about my own.

I once walked into Lawrence Taylor. Long after he was the linebacker for the Giants I bot looking where I was going, slammed into the chest of one of the largest human beings I have ever seen in my life. Lightening bolt ear ring and all. I was leaving and he was entering the movie theater at a large mall in Nyack New York. All I could do was stammer 'uh...uh...sorry man'. The big man looked down and giggled. 'No problem kid."

I was once standing in line for an Amtrak ticket at the Providence Train Station. I got to the window and paid for and recieved my round trip ticket to New York City to visit my then-girlfriend (now Wife) about five years ago. I turned around and walking up the ticket line behind me was Sam Waterston. This was at a time when Law & Order was still a favorite of mine and I was blown away.
"Excuse me Sir, I don't want to be a pest, I just wanted to let you know that I am a big fan of your work." He smiled a bit and thanked me and we went about our business. Seemed nice didn't blow me off, I just walked away and let him have his privacy.
Let me first say that I have no idea what else could have happened to this guy that day. I don't no why he was travelling so have no basis to pass judgement; but I was an bit disappointed to see him red faced and flustered as he left the dining car shouting 'Do you have any idea who I am!'


At the small Vermont liberal arts college that I attended the Rugby team did all the security for the large concerts that the school hosted once a semester. The semester that I was on the Rugby team (hurt my ankle about two weeks into the season and decided that I really didn't want to play rugby I just wanted to drink as much as the rugby players did. And boy did I, but anyway) Buffalo Tom was the big musical act. In 1996 this was a very big deal. After spending a day preparing the gym for a few hundred college kids a white van pulled up to the back entrance of the building. A small red-headed guy gets out and starts saying hi but I don't catch his name. HE makes some jokes including one about the hat I'm wearing I throw some lame ass joke at him we trade good natured insults for the few minutes we work together unloading the bands equipment (guitars, basses, and amps) out of the van. A car later arrives with a few band members and I assume the guy I've been talking to is their roadie.

Hours later after I get something to eat and down as many beers as I can before the show, I come back to the gym just in time. Red-headed kid is on stage singing and playing. 'hey, how cool is it that these guys even trust their roadie enough to check their levels and do the soundcheck.'
'Roadie?! They don't have a roadie!' He was shouting now. "That's Bill Janovitz!"

After the show We were allowed into their huge backstage area where we -- and I assure you this is the truth as strange as it may sound -- played hangman on one of those enourmous dry-erase boards. And you would think that a creative bunch like one of my favorite local grunge acts would be good at hangman but alas when you get twenty college kids and a rock band together no one plays good hangman. A stramge evening.



In my sophmore year of college the (at the time) executive producer of The Simpsons David Silverman gave a presentation. I waited in line for hours and got great seats in the first couple of rows. His speech was entertaining but not very educational. Afterwards he managed to find the party at the biggest frat in town. After having more than a few warm beers he began taking requests for drawings and drew characters from the show all over the walls of the house. So long security deposit. Hello Hans Moleman.